Monday, August 10, 2009

Jane Teresa's comments about banning Communion on the Tongue

[My comments in red]>>>I'm a visitor to the Diocese of Portsmouth[UK], from Saturday evening until Monday morning. This morning I went to Mass, and I'll go to Mass on Monday morning, before my visit ends.Some people might have heard that on the 24th July, Bishop Crispian Hollis issued the following directive, which is being adhered to throughout the Diocese:>>>>...


During the current swine flu epidemic, in keeping with the latest guidelines that I have received, I recommend that the following measures be implemented in Catholic Churches throughout the diocese from this weekend:The Sign of Peace during Mass: instead of a handshake members of the congregation are asked to join their hands together, as in prayer, turn to their immediate neighbours, bowing slightly and saying “Peace be with you”.Holy Communion is to be given only on the hand, not on the tongue or from the chalice.Ministers of the Sacred Host are asked to ensure their hands are washed with sanitizers (provided) before and after ministering communion.These regulations will remain in place until further notice. It is hoped that the reasons for this temporary policy will be understood and appreciated. They have been made out of particular pastoral concern for the vulnerable, namely, the elderly, children and those with underlying health problems.Bishop Crispian Hollis<<<,>>>....

Now I know that Fr. Z has previously written about the doubtful legality of mandating that Communion be received only in the hand, and not on the tongue. I'd like to just share my perspective as a layperson of not being permitted to receive on the tongue. It’s quite difficult to write about something as personal as how I receive Communion, but I think that the situation calls for it.As a Catholic, I have only ever received Communion on the tongue, and my decision was based on the simple instinct as to which method of reception was more reverent. I was clueless about the history of it, and that receiving on the hand is quite unprecedented. It was simply the gesture which appealed. I wanted to receive the Lord like a little child. ....

After two years as a Catholic, I started kneeling to receive the Lord every time I received, because I was being fed by God Himself and no other posture seemed fitting for reception of the Lord. It is saddening not to be able to kneel at a Communion rail, and wait for the Lord to come to me. But even if I must stand in a line, receiving kneeling, on the tongue, is an exterior gesture which has helped me to grow in an interior spirit of humility, receptivity and childlike docility.I later learned more about the sacredness of the Priesthood. I learned about the Priest’s consecrated hands and the sacredness of his ordained ministry. As a female layperson, I had seen many other female laypeople reaching into the Tabernacle, and traipsing round the sanctuary. Some parishes would comprise of three or four churches, with one priest, and an army of female ministers, who really seemed to run the show. Things were very “feminised” – in the worst sense of that word – which could never really attract manly young men to the Priesthood. Because I do spend a lot of my time in churches, I was sometimes asked to do things around the sanctuary, and to move the sacred vessels. People thought I was totally nuts for not feeling worthy to handle them. But I think it is for the Priest, and by extension, for his male servers, and not for me. If it is not for me to touch the sacred vessels, how greater is my unwillingness to touch the Body of the Lord with my unconsecrated hands!Let’s get it straight: Communion on the hand is licit. The fact that my conscience will not permit it does not mean that my subjective views are to be held above the legal decisions of our Holy Fathers Benedict and John Paul II. ....

My conscience simply pertains to me; someone who loves her Eucharistic Lord, and loves the sacramental Priesthood. Unfortunately, my conscience will not allow me to receive Communion on the hand, so I shall have to wait until Tuesday.Perhaps not everyone would suffer by being deprived Communion for two days. It must vary a great deal from person to person. It’s true that as you draw closer to the Lord, you can be thrust into a storm and yet remain tranquil and at peace. One can offer it up and draw closer to the Lord. But it has been painful. Perhaps Bishop Hollis has not considered how his decision, apart from its questionable legality and hygienic value, impacts upon people's consciences, and is leading people to be deprived of Holy Communion. >>>>

Bravo! I believe J.T.'s point about people's consciences being trampled upon is her strongest.

All the 'soft touch' prelates that pride themselves on their tolerance of pro-choice catholics, women's ordination, protestant and muslim brethren, clown dancing, etc... uncloak their daggers when it comes to kneeling Catholics....

I'm past thinking it is ironic....apparently all the above qualities fit very well together

k.c.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...
Loading...